Science Museum Launches The Life Game

11/06/2013

To mark the Centenary of the Medical Research Council, the Science Museum will host The Life Game – a festival that will take visitors on a journey through ‘Life’ to discover how medical research can help us lead long and healthy lives.  The free two day event will run at the Science Museum from 15-16 June.

On arrival, visitors are encouraged to pick up a paper character (‘Pal’) which they take with them around the festival. As they travel through the festival and different stages of life, people will customise their ‘Pal’ by taking chances and making choices to fill their character’s life story with colourful experiences.

Throughout the festival visitors will meet scientists from the Medical Research Council to find out about their latest research and interact with characters played by performers. Free talks on different areas of health and wellbeing will be available in The Lecture Theatre on the ground floor.

The event is supported by the Medical Research Council to celebrate its Centenary and produced in partnership with non zero one – Resident Theatre Company at Royal Holloway, University College London. 

The free festival takes place on the first floor and is open from 10.00 until 16.45. The festival is suitable for families with children aged 8+.  For more details visit www.sciencemuseum.org.uk


EXHIBITORS

MRC Social, Genetic and Developmental Psychiatry Centre

How will the friends and family around your pal affect its health?

MRC Centre for Developmental Neurobiology

What are your pal’s chances of being wired up correctly?

MRC/CSO Social and Public Health Sciences Unit, University of Glasgow (DASH)

How easily does your pal learn to bounce back from unpleasant events in life?

MRC Centre for Molecular Bacteriology and Infection

Germs may be small, but they put up a good fight. How can your pal best beat them?

MRC Centre for Outbreak Analysis and Modelling

Will your pal survive the disease outbreak?

MRC-HPA Centre for Environment & Health

Could devices such as a smartphone help your pal avoid unhealthy areas?

MRC & Asthma UK Centre in Allergic Mechanisms of Asthma

Why do people develop allergies? Is there a way to cure them?

MRC Centre for Transplantation

How can we help transplant patients return to a normal life?

MRC Unit for Lifelong Health and Ageing

Is it ever too late, or too early, to aim towards a long and healthy life?

TALKS PROGRAMME

Saturday 15 June
Lecture Theatre, Ground Floor

13.30: An Apple a Day
Anne Mullen, Diabetes & Nutritional Sciences Division, King's College London
What’s in your packed lunch? Does it have what your body needs to grow and repair itself? Find out what to eat and what to steer clear of.

14.45: Voices, Viruses and Vaccinations
Harriet Mills and Michael White, MRC Centre for Outbreak Analysis and modelling
Viruses are all over the news. When should you be worried and when should you be carefree? Do we always hear the truth?

16.00: Old Brain, New Brain- What’s the difference?
Neil Roberts and Robin Morton, Centre for Cognitive Ageing and Cognitive Epidemiology, Edinburgh, Scotland
Play around with a 3D projection of a living brain to explore differences between adult and older brains. What can you do to keep your brain young?

Sunday 16 June
Lecture Theatre, Ground Floor

13.30: Young Londoners
Ursula Read and Seeromanie Harding, MRC Social and Public Health Science Unit and DASH participants
Meet young Londoners who participate in a very special study: their mental and physical health is followed from childhood into adulthood. Hear about their experiences and ask questions. How does London life affect health? Will it affect yours?    

14:45: Inside the Teen Brain
Lauren Heathcote, Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Oxford
Why do teenagers act the way they do? Find out what goes on inside the brain of an adolescent. What have neuroscientists uncovered?

16.00: Old Brain, New Brain- What’s the difference?
Neil Roberts and Robin Morton, Centre for Cognitive Ageing and Cognitive Epidemiology, Edinburgh, Scotland
Play around with a 3D projection of a living brain to explore differences between adult and older brains. What can you do to keep your brain young?

The event is supported by the Medical Research Council to celebrate its Centenary. 
Produced in partnership with non zero one. Non zero one are Resident Theatre Company at Royal Holloway, University College London. 
Ends

Social Media information
Join in the conversation on Twitter: #100MRC or visit www.sciencemuseum.org.uk

For press information please contact Laura Singleton, Science Museum - Laura.Singleton@sciencemuseum.org.uk . Tel: 0207 942 4364.

Visitor Information
Science Museum, Exhibition Road, London, SW7 2DD. Open daily 10.00 to 18.00, except 24-26 December. www.sciencemuseum.org.uk / 0870 870 4868
@sciencemuseum    www.facebook.com/sciencemuseumlondon



Notes to Editors

The Science Museum
As the home of human ingenuity, the Science Museum’s world-class collection forms an enduring record of scientific, technological and medical achievements from across the globe. Welcoming over 3 million visitors a year, the Museum aims to make sense of the science that shapes our lives, inspiring visitors with iconic objects, award-winning exhibitions and incredible stories of scientific achievement. www.sciencemuseum.org.uk

The Medical Research Council has been at the forefront of scientific discovery to improve human health. Founded in 1913 to tackle tuberculosis, the MRC now invests taxpayers’ money in some of the best medical research in the world across every area of health. Twenty-nine MRC-funded researchers have won Nobel prizes in a wide range of disciplines, and MRC scientists have been behind such diverse discoveries as vitamins, the structure of DNA and the link between smoking and cancer, as well as achievements such as pioneering the use of randomised controlled trials, the invention of MRI scanning, and the development of a group of antibodies used in the making of some of the most successful drugs ever developed. Today, MRC-funded scientists tackle some of the greatest health problems facing humanity in the 21st century, from the rising tide of chronic diseases associated with ageing to the threats posed by rapidly mutating micro-organisms. www.mrc.ac.uk
 
The MRC Centenary Timeline chronicles 100 years of life-changing discoveries and shows how our research has had a lasting influence on healthcare and wellbeing in the UK and globally, right up to the present day. www.centenary.mrc.ac.uk

non zero one
non zero one’s work activates people by exploring the relationships between them and using creative approaches to space and technology. Their productions include the time out at the Barbican Centre, you’ll see [me sailing in antarctica] on the roof of the National Theatre as part of the National Theatre Inside Out and the London 2012 Festival, this is where we got to when you came in at the Bush Theatre (Off West End award for “Best Entertainment”) and would like to meet at the Barbican Centre. non zero one are Resident Theatre Company at Royal Holloway, University of London.
www.nonzeroone.com