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Part of a human stomach dissected by Edward Jenner, England, 1790-1823

Edward Jenner (1749-1823) was the pioneer of vaccination but was also known for his delicate dissections. Here, the section of the stomach has been flattened and injected with wax to show the veins and arteries as well as the delicate membrane of the stomach wall. It may have been used as a teaching aid to show the structure of the stomach. Dissection was an increasingly common part of medical education at this time but due to a lack of bodies preparations such as this were important to show students the workings of the human body. Without wax injection, the blood vessels could not be as easily identified.

Object number:

A600030

Glossary:

Glossary: human remains

term created as part of the NMSI human remains policy (from April 2007); Other terms used are 'blood' and 'human hair'

Glossary: vaccination

The introduction of vaccine into the body for the purpose of inducing immunity. Coined originally to apply to the injection of smallpox vaccine, the term has come to mean any immunising procedure in which vaccine is injected.

Glossary: stomach

J-shaped organ, lying to the left and slightly below the diaphragm in human beings; one of the organs of the digestive system. The stomach produces gastric juices that break down proteins.

Glossary: dissection

The cutting apart and separation of body tissues for the purposes of critical examination. Dissection of corpses is often carried out for the study of anatomy.