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First Aid kit in japanned metal case, England, 1931-1932

‘Tabloid’ was a brand patented by Henry Wellcome in 1884 and was used for a wide range of Burroughs, Wellcome & Co products, such as this first aid kit. It was later extended to other products such as first aid kits. The word ‘tabloid’ referred to the compressed nature of the drugs. This medical meaning may be lost to time, but the word remains in common usage in the newspaper trade. This kit was designed for public service vehicles such as buses, trams and trains. The kit contains equipment to treat minor injuries: bandages, a tourniquet to stem heavy bleeding, burn dressings, a splint to stabilise bone fractures, a pair of artery forceps and smelling salts used to bring around someone who has fainted.

Object number:

1981-1565

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Glossary:

Glossary: first aid kit

A kit designed to give help to an injured person until proper medical treatment is available

Glossary: bandage

A strip of material such as gauze used to protect, immobilize, compress, or support a wound or injured body part

Glossary: artery forceps

forceps are a two-bladed instrument with a handle for compressing or grasping tissues in surgical operations, and for handling sterile dressings, etc. Artery forceps are for specifically grasping and compressing an artery.

Glossary: tourniquet

Designed to compress the blood vessels of a limb. It consists of a bandage, pad and screw. By varying the tightness of the tourniquet, it is possible to control the circulation of blood for a short time.

Glossary: splint

A rigid device of plastic, wood or plaster that serves to immobilize or support an injury. Generally strapped alongside an injured limb.

Glossary: smelling salts

Used to arouse consciousness. The salts release a small amount of ammonia, which triggers the nasal passage's inhalation reflex.