Pewter sauce boat, unknown touchmark, English, 18th century

Pewter sauce boat with unknown touchmark, English, 18th century.
Pewter sauce boat, unknown touchmark, English, 18th century. Pewter is an alloy of tin which can contain small amounts of lead, copper, antimony and bismuth. Athough known to the Egyptians, pewter was not widely used until Roman times, when it was used for tableware. The composition of English pewter was carefully protected by the Worshipful Company of Pewterers in London from the 15th century onwards. Until the end of the 18th century the only method of manufacture was by casting various parts followed by soldering. In the last quarter of the 18th century objects were made from pewter by stamping and spinning.The pewter used in these techniques was called Britannia Metal and was harder and stronger than the old cast pewter. This enabled cheaper and more elaborate objects to be maufactured.
 
Currently on display in:
Making the Modern World
Year made :
1701-1800
Inventory number :
A651602