Making the Modern World

     

    On Display

    Fleming's penicillin mould, 1935.

    A sample of Penicillium mould presented by Alexander Fleming to Douglas Macleod, 1935.

     
    Kenwood Sodastream, 1978.

    Kenwood Sodastream model by Sodastream Ltd. of Peterborough, 1978

     
    Caesium atomic clock, 1955.

    This was the first successfull atomic clock, with an accuracy of one second in 300 years. It measures time by counting the vibrations of caesium atoms. The caesium atoms are subjected to radio waves of a very high frequency as they pass down an evacu

     
    Jodrell Bank Radio Telescope, c 1957.

    This model (scale 1:200), of the Lovell Radio Telescope at Jodrell Bank, Cheshire was made in 1961. United Steel Companies Companies, who constructed the radio telescope for Manchester University, also built this model. Known as the Mark-1 Telescop

     
    Orrery, 1910-1920.

    Dated to the early twentieth century, this planetary model was made by Laing Planetarium Company in Detroit, United States. Called an orrery, or more correctly a tellurium it is a demonstration model to show the motions of the Earth and Moon around

     
    Herschel's seven-foot telescope, 1795-1816.

    Dated to the start of the nineteenth century, this reflecting telescope was made by the famous astronomer, William Herschel for his sister Caroline. She was William's lifelong observing assistant and an astronomer in her own right having discovered

     
    Wooden statue of Saint Margaret, possibly French, 1700-1850.

    Wooden statue of Saint Margaret of Antioch, patron of nurses, invoked by married woman and against sterility, wounds and facial blemishes, possibly French, 1700-1850

     
    Maudslay's screw-cutting lathe, c 1800.

    Model of original screw-cutting lathe by Henry Maudslay, 1800. Before Maudslay's invention, screws were crudely made by hand. In this machine the combination of Maudslay's slide rest wih a power-driven screw feed was the prototype of the modern screw

     
    Enema syringes, 18th-19th century.

    Large ivory enema syringe, piston action, French, 18th century. Illustrated in the middle of the image with A606171 (19th century plastic enema syringe) on the right and A626202 (19th century brass enema syringe) on the left.

     
    Arkwright 's prototype spinning machine, 1769.

    Arkwright's prototype spinning machine, 1769. The machine uses the drawing roller method invented by Lewis Paul in 1738. It was constructed with the assistance of John Kay, clockmaker. The cotton fibres to be spun passed through four pairs of rolle