The Science and Art of Medicine

     

    On Display

    Malmstrom obstetrical vacuum extractor, Swedish, 1979.

    This instrument was used to help deliver babies, in place of forceps. It is a type designed by the Swede T Malmstrom in the 1950s and was manufactured by AB Vacuum Extractor in Sweden. In 1849 Sir James Young Simpson (1811-1870) successfully used a s

     
    Obstetrical forceps, c 1871-1900.

    These are long obstetrical forceps following the design of Sir James Young Simpson, 1811-1870. They are longer and heavier than Simpson�s type of short forceps and were used to deliver babies from higher up the birth canal. The forceps are made out o

     
    Obstetrical forceps, c 1871-1900.

    These are short obstetrical forceps following the design of Sir James Young Simpson, 1811-1870. They were used to deliver babies from low down in the birth canal. The forceps are made out of steel and ebony and manufactured by Philip Harris & Co of B

     
    Posset pot, English, c 1700.

    Elaborate posset pot, tin glazed earthenware, cherub and songbird motifs, English

     
    Amuletic necklace, West Africa, 1880-1920.

    An amuletic necklace made of horn, claw, nuts and metal, strung together on a leather thong. It is common to put medicine in an animal horn, and necklace charms are often worn around the neck as protection against illness and ill fortune.

     
    Artificial nose, 17th-18th century.

    Full view. Artificial nose, made of plated metal, from the 17th or 18th century. Such noses would have been made to replace an original, which may have been congenitally absent or deformed, lost through accident or during combat or due to a degener

     
    Resuscitation kit, first half of the 19th century
     
    Antiseptic machine, 1879.

    Apparatus for rendering the atmosphere antiseptic (hammer action). Inscribed 'Bells Patent, 1879, Newcastle on Tyne'

     
    Amputation saw, 17th Century.

    Large hacksaw-shaped amputation saw, perhaps 17th century

     
    Two pharmacy jars, 1723-1763.

    Tin-glazed earthenware drug jar, peacock motif, used for hiera picra electuary, by the Porcelain Dish factory, Dutch, 1723-1763