The Science and Art of Medicine

     

    On Display

    Early inoculation items, c 1798-1825.

    Cow's horn, inscribed 'G.C. Jenner, 1825'.

     
    'Med-E-Jet' inoculation gun, United States, 1980.

    "Med-E-Jet" inoculation gun, in carrying case, by Med-E-Jet Corporation, Cleveland, Ohio, 1980. This gun was designed to make mass immunisation more efficient. It enabled the user to give many people a small dose of vaccine or drug and was used durin

     
    Vaccination lancets, late 18th-early 19th century.

    These lancets belonged to Edward Jenner (1749-1823). In 1796 Edward Jenner (1749-1823) used a lancet to introduce fluid from a cowpox sore through a person's skin, in order to inoculate them against smallpox, a similar but more dangerous disease. He

     
    Jackson X-ray tube, 1896.

    Jackson Focus X-ray tubes

     
    Resuscitator kit, English, 1774.

    Resuscitator for reviving "persons apparently dead", labelled "Royal Humane Society 1774", English

     
    Apparatus for continuous intra-muscular infusion of penicillin, c 1950s.

    Apparatus for continuous intra-muscular infusion of penicillin, by Willen Bros. of London, designed by C. E. Last

     
    Anastomosis button, c 1930.

    Murphy's anastomosis button, steel, chrome-plated, by Down of London.

     
    Gastro-intestinal bobbins, 1880-1920.

    Mayo Robson's bone bobbins, set of 22 of varying size, 1880-1920, probably British

     
    Barber-surgeon's sign, English, 1680-1830.

    Barber surgeon's, double sided carved and painted wooden plaque with images of Death and Time and scene of blood letting

     
    Laryngeal lancet, early 20th century.

    Laryngeal lancet, MacKenzie type, steel, nickel plated, by Down Bros. of London