Artist in residence

Artist in residence

Cornelia Parker

Another day spent by Cornelia Parker (image Andreas Schmidt)

Another day spent by Cornelia Parker (image Andreas Schmidt)

Cornelia Parker - Artist in residence

  • Another day spent
  • September 1998 - March 1999

Cornelia Parker used her residency to investigate, select and transform our understanding of objects from the Science Museum's collections by making subtle additions to existing displays. Another day spent was a series of interventions in the form of objects, drawings, photographs, macrophotographs and photograms dispersed throughout the galleries and her interpretation of iconic objects made mischievous allusions to the formality and grandeur of the surrounding scientific works.

The negative of glory, a bundle of waste metal shavings resulting from the process of medal-making, can still be found in the Challenge of Materials gallery on the first floor of the Museum.

Read the object labels originally written to accompany Another day spent

About the artist

British artist Cornelia Parker’s (born 1956) work is concerned with formalising things beyond our control, containing the volatile and making it into something that is quiet and contemplative like the 'eye of the storm'. Her work triggers cultural metaphors and personal associations which allow the viewer to witness the transformation of the most ordinary objects into something compelling and extraordinary.

More about the artwork

Object labels originally written to accompany Another day spent


Exploring Space gallery, ground floor (no longer on display):

  • Einstein's abstract: Photomicrograph of the blackboard covered with Einstein's equations from his 1931 Oxford lecture on the theory of relativity. With thanks to the Museum of the History of Science, Oxford.
  • Inside out: Photogram made using the horsehair stuffing from a padded cell.
  • Outside in: Macrophotograph of the surface of a padded cell in the Science Museum's collection.

Challenge of Materials gallery, first floor:

  • The negative of glory: Metal shavings produced during the process of making medals. With thanks to the Royal Mint.

Surveying gallery, first floor (no longer on display):

  • Marks made by Freud, subconsciously: Photomicrograph of the seat of Freud's chair. With thanks to the Freud Museum.

Computing and Mathematics gallery, second floor (no longer on display):

  • Drawings made by money: Marks made on paper placed in the chutes of the machines that mint money. With thanks to the Royal Mint.
  • Political abstract: Photomicrograph of the handle of the Chancellor's Budget bag used from 1859 to 1996. With thanks to HM Treasury.

Weighing and Measuring gallery, second floor (no longer on display):

  • Measure of a man: Silver dollar coin drawn into a piece of wire the average height of a man.

Lighting gallery, second floor (no longer on display):

  • Spent light bulb exposed by a live match: Photogram
  • Spent match exposed by a live one: Photogram

Nuclear Physics and Power gallery, second floor (no longer on display):

  • Commons and Lords: Photograms made using fluff and dust collected from both chambers of the Houses of Parliament.

Photography and Cinematography gallery, third floor (no longer on display):

  • Avoided object: Photograph of the sky through the window of the Imperial War Museum, taken with the camera that belonged to Hoess, commandant of Auschwitz. Camera kindly lent by the Imperial War Museum.

Flight gallery, third floor (no longer on display):

  • Feather found at the top of Beachy Head: Photogram

The Science and Art of Medicine gallery, fifth floor (no longer on display):

  • Object that was thrown in anger: Silver

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