Social Light

Social Light

Scott Snibbe

Read about the artwork

Social Light by Scott Snibbe - © Snibbe Interactive

Social Light by Scott Snibbe - © Snibbe Interactive

Social Light by Scott Snibbe - © Snibbe Interactive

Social Light by Scott Snibbe - © Snibbe Interactive

Scott Snibbe - Social Light

  • 2007
  • Interactive installation
  • Currently on display
  • Location: Launchpad, third floor

In 2006 Scott Snibbe was commissioned to create an artwork responding to the themes of Launchpad, the Science Museum's popular hands-on physics gallery for young people aged 8 to 14 years.

Social Light creates an embodied simulation of light as a metaphor for human communication. Visitors interact with the artwork using their bodies to generate a series of shadow-play scenarios. They become, by turn, a lens, a mirror, a prism and a light-absorbing vessel. Social Light explores the ways we influence and are influenced by our immediate environment and our interactions with others, using subverted light behaviours as a vehicle. There are infinite variations to the effects produced and each reaction is unique to the individual visitor interacting with the artwork.

Scott Snibbe's work is very much public art, designed to be instantly appealing to children, but also conceptually engaging to adults who may notice references to Minimalism, Brian Eno or even the infamous Pink Floyd Dark Side of the Moon album cover. Snibbe says, 'both the three-year-old child and art historian can get as much as each other from the work'.

You can also capture your experience with Social Light and e-mail home a unique video to share with your friends.

About the artist

American artist Scott Snibbe (born 1969) is an interactive media artist. For the past 15 years he has been creating electronic media installations that directly engage the body of the viewer in a reactive system. His works are designed to have specific social effects: to create a sense of interdependence, to promote friendly interaction between strangers, and to increase viewers’ concentration.

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