On Display

The first Wright Aeroplane, 1903.

Replica, modelled from the original. Orville Wright (1871-1948) and Wilbur Wright (1867-1912) made the world's first controlled and powered flights on 17th December 1903 at Kitty Hawk, North Carolina.

 
Steam engine and boiler made for  Stringfellow's flying machine of 1847-8.

Original steam engine and boiler made for the Stringfellow flying machine 1847-8. John Stringfellow was a founder member of the Aeronautical Society (now the Royal Aeronautical Society) in 1866. In 1847-1848, he made a ten foot span model based on th

 
German Fokker E III Monoplane, 1915.

The Fokker E III Monoplane was designed for the German air forces by the Dutch aeroplane designer Anthony Fokker (1890-1939). The E III, or 'Eindecker' (one-wing) was a highly significant development in military aviation. Not only did it boast consid

 
Hinks liquid oxygen vaporiser c 1923.

5 litre flask, complete, for oxygen breathing apparatus. Liquid oxygen was contained in the 5 litre vacuum walled flask. As oxygen evaporated, it built up pressure, and the gas was forced up and through the coil element on top. A tube took it to the

 
Flying helmet, Air Ministry, c 1941.

Leather flying helmet, with zipped ear pockets, and fittings for oxygen mask. Air Ministry, c. 1941

 
The Rolls-Royce vertical take-off-thrust measuring rig, 1954.

1:24 scale model of the Rolls-Royce 'Vertical take-off thrust measuring rig' (colloquially known as the 'Flying Bedstead')

 
Section of a Boeing 747, 1973.

Section of Boeing 747 foreward fuselage (cut from 747-SR-46 supplied to Japan Air Lines 21/12/73). The 747, or Jumbo Jet, as it is popularly known, is the world's largest and best-known jet airliner.

 
Alcock and Brown's Vickers Vimy biplane, 1919.

The aircraft in which Alcock and Brown made the first non-stop crossing of the Atlantic.

 
Junkers Ju 87-D 'Stuka', c 1939.

Model of Junkers Ju 87-D aircraft, scale 1:24. A new method of aerial warfare was demonstrated by the German Luftwaffe in 1939. Advancing Panzer divisions had the close cooperation of dive bombers to blast away at enemy defenses.

 
The Cierva Autogiro C6D, c 1926.

Model of Cierva Autogiro C.6D, scale 1:10 In an attempt to make flying safer at take-off and landing, the Spaniard Juan de la Cierva developed the 'gyroplane', in which the lift is achieved by a free spinning rotor. The autogiro, predecessor to the t