On Display

Voisin Aeroplane, c 1908.

Model of Voisin Aeroplane scale 1:10. By 1908 the Voisin biplane was standardised in the form seen in this model. Despite being unmanoeuvrable in any true sense, it was deemed the first viable European aeroplane.

 
Section of a Boeing 747, 1973.

Section of Boeing 747 foreward fuselage (cut from 747-SR-46 supplied to Japan Air Lines 21/12/73). The 747, or Jumbo Jet, as it is popularly known, is the world's largest and best-known jet airliner.

 
Alcock and Brown's Vickers Vimy biplane, 1919.

The aircraft in which Alcock and Brown made the first non-stop crossing of the Atlantic.

 
Junkers Ju 87-D 'Stuka', c 1939.

Model of Junkers Ju 87-D aircraft, scale 1:24. A new method of aerial warfare was demonstrated by the German Luftwaffe in 1939. Advancing Panzer divisions had the close cooperation of dive bombers to blast away at enemy defenses.

 
Control mechanism of Bleriot monoplane, 1909.

Portion of Fuselage containing control mechanism; of Bleriot Monoplane. French aviator Louis Bleriot (1872-1936) made the first cross-Channel heavier-than-air flight in his No XI monoplane on 25 July 1909.

 
Supermarine Rolls Royce Seaplane, S6B S1595, 1931.

Supermarine Seaplane, S.6.B. S.1595 (with dummy engine). Winner of the Schneider Trophy, 1931. This aircraft was designed by Reginald J. Mitchell (1895-1937), the designer of several world-beating seaplanes and the famous Supermarine Spitfire. It was a

 
Wright Flyer, 1903.

Model of Wright Aeroplane, 1903, scale 1:10 Diorama featuring a model (scale 1:10) of the aircraft in which Orville Wright (1871-1948) and Wilbur Wright (1867-1912) made the world's first controlled and powered flights on 17 December 1903. The brothe

 
Vickers 'Viscount' airliner, 1953.

Model of Vickers 'Viscount' Airliner, scale 1:48. The Viscount was the first aircraft powered by gas turbine (turboprop) engines to enter regular airline service. The first flight took place on 18 April 1953 with British European Airways (BEA) on the

 
SE5a fighter, 1917.

SE5A Aeroplane, 1916 The Farnborough-designed SE5A was the last British fighter of World War I. The aircraft had a top speed of 130 mph, a ceiling of 22,000 feet and an endurance of three hours making it one of the most effective fighters of the wa

 
Gloster-Whittle E28/39 jet aeroplane, 1941.

The E28/39 was the first Allied jet aircraft, having its first official flight on 15 May 1941.