On Display

Boyle's type anaesthetic machine, 1941-1963.

This is the back bar for a Boyle's type anaesthetic machine with vaporisers for ether and trilene, flowmeters for oxygen, cyclopropane and nitrous oxide, and a rebreathing bag. The apparatus was made by the British Oxygen Company Ltd, London, England

 
Orthopaedic corsets, 19th century.

Brass orthopaedic corsets (A158526 & A121452), to correct deformities of the bones or muscles. Probably made in England during the 19th century

 
Swan's electric filament lamp, 1878-1879.

Early carbon and rod filament incandescent electric lamp 1878-9. Made by the English chemist, Joseph Swan (1827-1914).

 
Set of vaccination lancets, 19th century.

Six lancets, steel and tortoiseshell, by Weiss of London, in shagreen and silver case, 19th century, relic of Jenner

 
Chronoscope, 1921-39.

Chronoscope made by the National Institute of Industrial Psychology(NIIP), London, and was used to measure reaction times in pyschological tests, c.1921-1939. A chronoscope is used for measuring small amounts of time, to an accuracy of 1/1000th of a

 
Chronoscope, 1921-39.

Chronoscope made by the National Institute of Industrial Psychology(NIIP), London, and was used to measure reaction times in pyschological tests, c.1921-1939. A chronoscope is used for measuring small amounts of time, to an accuracy of 1/1000th of a

 
Flymo Super Professional 47 rotary air cushion mower, 1979-1980.

This mower is an example of the now famous Hover mower made by Flymo Ltd, of Darlington, Co Durham. It was Flymo who made the air-cushion mower into a practical proposition, and into an everyday sight on the lawns of Great Britain.

 
Ammoniaphone, 'for voice cultivation by chemical means', English, 1871-1900.

Metal ammoniaphone, for voice cultivation, in box, invented by Dr. Carter Moffat, manufactured by Medical Battery Co., London

 
Plane table outfit, 1745-1755.

This plane table was made by Benjamin Cole. Plane tabling is a method of survey which allows observations to be plotted directly on a map by a surveyor in the field. Modern versions are still used today for filling in or updating detail on street pla

 
Circumferentor, 1750-1763.

This circumferentor was made by George Adams of London, one of the top instrument makers of the day. It was used between 1750-1763 on the survey of the Mason-Dixon line, in America. The instrument is inscribed in an engraved circle; 'Geo: Adams LONDO